Root Canal Treatment

Root canal treatment can save an infected tooth from otherwise certain extraction—it’s a proven procedure that will leave your mouth healthy and strong while restoring its natural appearance.

Root Canal Treatment

A tooth’s inner structure consists of a soft, delicate material called the pulp. This material is normally protected by the tough enamel material that surrounds it. However, a potentially serious infection can occur if harmful bacteria are able to access the inside pulp. This happens occasionally due to deep cavities or unexpected injuries. If you don’t receive treatment, you could likely lose your tooth. Root canal treatment is a great solution to overcome a serious inner tooth infection.

Illustration of a tooth cross section showing roots and nerves
  • How long does the pain from a root canal last?

    There is a common misconception that root canals are very painful. The truth is, a root canal isn’t usually any more painful than a typical dental filling. The dentists usually provide an anesthetic before the procedure so during and a short while after there isn’t a huge amount of discomfort. There will likely be tenderness or sensitivity for a few days though as the root canal heals because the tissues around the gums could be swollen or agitated.

  • What are alternatives to Root Canal Treatment?

    Most people facing root canal treatment are curious as to whether there are alternative procedures worth considering. Since endodontic therapy is considered a “last line of defense” for restoring your tooth, the only remaining options are to have your tooth extracted or wait until you’re in pain and have it removed at a later date. Unfortunately, with either of these options, you risk the infection spreading deeper into your face or adjacent teeth. Getting a root canal is the best possible solution.

    If you opt to have your tooth extracted, there’s still the concern of replacing it as soon as possible. Otherwise, the extra space in your bite can throw off the alignment of your surrounding teeth. Two of the more common replacement options include a dental bridge or implant.

Questions About Root Canal Treatment?

If you have any questions about root canal treatment, contact us or request an appointment using the links below, or explore the variety of other dental services we provide.